12
Jul
Acquisitions, Sunday 1st July 2012.
I had never even heard of the Hardy. I bought it for its opening line:

On an early winter afternoon, clear but not cold, when the vegetable world was a weird multitude of skeletons through whose ribs the sun shone freely, a gleaming landau came to a pause on the crest of a hill in Wessex.

I might not read the rest of it.

Acquisitions, Sunday 1st July 2012.

I had never even heard of the Hardy. I bought it for its opening line:

On an early winter afternoon, clear but not cold, when the vegetable world was a weird multitude of skeletons through whose ribs the sun shone freely, a gleaming landau came to a pause on the crest of a hill in Wessex.

I might not read the rest of it.


29
Jun
What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.
— Carl Sagan (via olanthanide)

(via the-hard-luck-lady-deactivated2)

12
Jun

bookstorey:

Lays of Ancient Rome,
Lord Macaulay


Although now you would struggle to find a copy in a high street bookshop, in its heyday Macaulay’s Lays of Ancient Rome, originally published in 1842, was recited in many a Victorian parlour and provided the first commercial success for its publisher Longmans. A set text in British public schools for over one hundred years, likely, it was as widely read in the past as Harry Potter is today. Among its notable fans was Winston Churchill who is said to have memorised it.


The lays themselves (Horatius, The Battle of Lake Regillus, Virginia and The Prophecy of Capys) are narrative poems based on semi-mythical heroic and tragic episodes in Roman history.


The photographs are of the New Edition published by Longmans around 1880s with the original illustrations by George Sharf, Jun.

6
Jun
You must write every single day of your life… You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads… may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.
— Ray Bradbury (via justinpoole)